Hyper-love?

 

It is interesting that those who accuse us of a doctrine of “hyper-grace” don’t also accuse us of “hyper-love.”  After all, the whole understanding of the gospel is about the love of God.  Grace is simply the means God uses to act on His love.

But, of course, we are accused of going “over the top” about love, aren’t we?  I was recently in a discussion with someone who wanted me to admit that there are limits to God’s love.  When I wanted him to delineate those limits, he couldn’t.  He just wanted to be sure that I left room for God’s anger, wrath, and hatred.  Those things were important to him and I wasn’t talking about them enough.

Now, let me say at the outset that I see the anger of God in the Bible.  I see His wrath and even hatred.  But it isn’t pointed at individuals.  It is pointed at sin.

There’s a great story in 2 Chronicles 33 and 2 Kings 21about a man named Manasseh.  This man was king in Jerusalem after Hezekiah, his father, died.  He was very bad.  He led the people away from the Lord in ways others had not.  He even sacrificed his own children in the fire.  He shed innocent blood throughout Judah.  Eventually, the Lord sent the Assyrians to capture Manasseh and take him into captivity.

And God said He was angry.  In 2 Kings 21, God says that Manasseh had provoked Him to anger.  The Lord tried to reach out to Manasseh, but he wouldn’t listen.  So, with hooks in his nose, Manasseh went into bondage.

Now, how would it have helped for the prophets of God to come to Manasseh, while he was in bondage, to tell him how much God hated him?  Suppose they had told Manasseh of the wrath of God against him and the anger God felt as He looked at Manasseh.  Would that have helped?  Or would that have driven Manasseh farther away?

Instead, when Manasseh was suffering and broken, when his sins had brought him to the lowest place of his life, he cried out to the Lord.  For some reason, he thought God might hear him and forgive.  And that’s exactly what God did!  He not only forgave Manasseh, but He brought him back to Jerusalem and set him up again as king of Judah.  Amazing Love!

You see, that little story, hidden in the back rooms of Scripture, is not a story of the anger of God, but a story of the love of God.  It was love that moved the heart of God to send Manasseh into captivity.  It was love that moved the heart of God to forgive and restore Manasseh.  This was likely the most cruel and evil king who ever sat on Jerusalem’s throne, yet God loved him.  He abused and killed the people, even his own children, yet God loved him.  The love of God is greater than any sin and reaches out to any sinner.

Is that a love that’s too big?  Should we tone it down a little to make sure there’s room for hate and anger?  I don’t think so.  This is the love of God and it is as big as He is.

Maybe we should accept the term, “hyper-grace.”  If grace is the working out of the love of God for us, then it would have to be over the top, bigger than anything.  If grace proceeds from the love of God, then nothing can even pretend to balance it, counter it, or soften it.

Maybe hyper-grace is the natural result of hyper-love.

1 Comment

Filed under Grace 101, heart, Relationship

One response to “Hyper-love?

  1. Prairiemom

    Yep. I like it! To be more accurate, we could call it “infinite grace” and “infinite love,” meaning love and grace without bounds, without beginning or end. But really, “hyper-love” and “hyper-grace” have a much hipper ring to them, even if they are not quite as accurate :-).

    I have such a hard time wrapping my mind around the full character of God, and it seems He only reveals one small part of His character to me at a time, but I believe that God is fully who He is all the time and is always exercising the entirety of his character. He is not loving BUT just, or merciful BUT holy. He is infinitely holy AND infinitely loving AND infinitely merciful AND wholly just AND full of infinite grace AND perfectly righteous, all day, every day, all at the same time.

    As far as I understand, God does not “balance” or temper his grace, mercy, and love with His justice, righteousness, and holiness. He is totally and completely all of those things all of the time. And because He is so perfect in all that He does and is, it would be fitting to say that He is hyper-loving, hyper-gracious, hyper-holy, hyper-righteous, hyper-just, and hyper-merciful, among other amazing things. God’s perfect characteristics are not in conflict with one another and are not exercised independently of one another, but He is who He is all the time. And for that I can rely on and trust Him completely. I can even hyper-trust Him LOL!

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